Cadence Group Exhibiting at ARMA LIVE!

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ARMA LIVE!, Cadence Group Exhibiting, Table 925-2, Oct. 15-17, 2017, Orlando
Information governance professionals from Atlanta-based Cadence Group will join thousands of other organizations from around the country at the ARMA International LIVE! Conference & Expo on October 15-17th. The event is taking place at the Orlando World Center Marriot.

This year’s ARMA LIVE! examines how the world uses records and data to make informed decisions and shape policy, as well as how this process is changing. Cadence Group has excelled in these areas and supported its clients for over two decades, come see how we are continuously adapting our methodology to leverage – and manage the risk associated with – the latest technology.

Cadence Group has many speakers this year, who will all be presenting on Tuesday the 17th.

Michael Allen, CRM, is leading a session on how to pitch your RIM initiative to the heads of businesses. Sit in on his session to learn and speak the language of the executives and the stakeholders, and provide you with methods for framing your message to get their attention and compel them to take action.

Mary Beth Weaver, CRM, CIP, PMP, MLS, is leading a session on how to maximize RIM training in the twenty-first century. Now that there’s so much information constantly being generated, stored, and deleted, everyone in an organization is a records manager. Sit in on her session to learn effective training techniques to keep up in the modern, fast-paced information environment.

Soo Kim and Tina Teree Baker, IGP, are leading a session that highlights strategies for managing shared drives. If a hundred or more employees are all accessing and saving information in the same place, how can you be sure to keep it clean and defensibly delete information? With Records Management tools available to help, stop by their session to get some solid ideas for surviving these challenges and more.

As one of more than 100 exhibitors at the conference, Cadence Group will be in the Consultant’s Corner (Table 925-2) sharing recent case studies and expertise on a variety of tools for Records and Information Management. Furthermore, we will be answering questions regarding software evaluation methodology, advantages/disadvantages of enterprise content management vs. information archiving solutions, records and information management training, e-mail management and network shared drive cleanup strategies, and more. Take a chance to meet with a number of session leaders! To learn more about the event visit: http://conference.explorearma.org/cms/

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About Cadence Group

Cadence Group, a certified woman owned small business, is a user-centric information management company with nearly 25 years of experience in consulting and information management services. Headquartered in Atlanta, GA, with an office in Washington, D.C., Cadence Group provides services to large federal agencies, as well as state and local governments. By combining information governance, process improvement, preparedness, web content management, records & information management, library science, knowledge management, user experience, training and technology services, Cadence Group helps corporate and government clients easily obtain, manage, disseminate, and communicate information. Clients optimize information assets, maintain compliance, and acquire information experts through Cadence Group’s consulting and placement services. http://www.cadence-group.com

Cadence Group Attends NCHCMM 2017, Atlanta Cadence Group hosted a booth at the National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing, and Media (NCHCMM) from August 15th to 17th. Over 800 federal, state, local, and academic information professionals from across the country, including Cadence Group staff, attended presentations on a diverse array of topics and broadened their horizons by learning about the latest developments in health communication research. These presentations included a poster session which featured projects focused on Zika, vaccine safety, PrEP, diabetes, and CDC laboratory sciences.

Cadence Group had the opportunity to meet with many of these professionals at our booth. The theme of the conference, “Big Challenges and Real World Solutions,” guided the majority of our discussions at the booth. One recurrent theme involved the challenges faced by communication systems for organizations. We suggested that many of these challenges could be addressed by properly organizing, storing, retrieving, using, and reusing content, and many visitors were surprised to learn that they could benefit from the application of specific professional disciplines such as records and information management and library science.

With this experience in mind, Cadence Group’s solution to the theme “Big Challenges and Real World Solutions” is the full range of activities involved in the process of acquiring, organizing and disseminating health communication messages. An overall strategy to communicate in a crisis well in advance requires defining the audience (risk group) and message. Involve members of the community in creating and testing the message and let them help decide on the channels for dissemination and the spokesperson. Finally, engage stakeholders to assist in evaluation of its effectiveness. With professional assistance from the experts at Cadence Group, your organization can develop health communication materials and marketing campaigns to effectively reduce risk and produce measurable changes in outcomes.

This piece is the first installment of a six-part series called
“Open to potential: How embracing open data can advance public health practice, governance, and research.”
Open Data

Open data” has become a popular buzzword, and has gathered impressive momentum as a cross-sectoral cause célèbre, gaining traction among data scientists, developers, politicians and civil society activists. It has been adopted to some extent on every level of governance, from multilateral institutions like the UN to nations including the US and UK to cities around the world. It is discussed at high-level seminars and justified with rationales ranging from the altruism to profit-focused business cases.

The public health case for open data is a compelling one, for reasons based both on principle as well as the potential for benefit to agencies and organizations themselves. To understand the buzz behind it and tap into its potential for public health, it is essential to understand what exactly open data is, who uses it, and why.

According to the open definition, open data is defined as “data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed by anyone – subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and sharealike.” The most important aspects of this are that it be available as a whole and at minimal cost (preferably free), and in a convenient and modifiable form that can be combined with other data. These same characteristics underlie the enormous potential for open data. It can be, and has been, used for initiatives ranging from scientific research and discovery to product development and everything in between. It can provide a means for health and human services agencies to be accountable to taxpayers, by showing how funds are spent and demonstrating the impact of publicly funded programs. On the flip side, it can also be useful for policymakers to assess the efficacy of health-targeted policies and interventions (and for practitioners to improve them, where possible). It has been used to develop countless consumer apps and improve emergency and humanitarian response.

The strongest testament to the benefits of open data may be the sheer number of public entities that have embraced it on some level – and city governments are, in many respects, leading the charge. While open data has been embraced on the national level here in the US and by many states, metropolitan governments have emerged as open data trailblazers. One of the very first open data portals was established by the Chief Technology Officer for the city of Washington, DC in 1996. City-focused open data initiatives have allowed citizens to develop locally-focused apps and directly request public services (like filling potholes). CDC has partnered with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the CDC Foundation on the 500 Cities Project, which aims to use open data from the census and public health surveys to provide information on “chronic disease risk factors, health outcomes, and clinical preventive service use for the largest 500 cities in the United States.” The hope is to give cities a sharper epidemiological view of their populations, which will in turn help them to design interventions and provide services more effectively.

Open data has enormous potential for public health. And yet, confusion and hesitation remains, and – particularly for thinly-stretched public health and other scientific agencies – understandably so. While open health data have enormous potential to be used for the public good, public health agencies and organizations have to balance this against regulations guarding protected health information, tight budgets, and limited resources to make sure the datasets and platforms are regularly updated.

More importantly, the transition to open data requires a shift to an “open data culture,” which faces many of the same barriers as transitioning to an institutional culture that embraces knowledge management. Indeed, the two are very closely related. For organizations to open their data, they have to know what data they possess and where it is; have clear, streamlined workflows to get it from initial collection to cleaning to a final product; and make sure that all data released are compliant with laws governing privacy and protection of confidential information. Much like efficient knowledge management practices, this requires champions with influence, relationship-building to break out of silos, legal clarity, and investment of resources into training for staff and the right platforms. Fortunately, many of the solutions are analogous as well.

In this series, we will open up open data in public health and see how it can be used to the benefit of public health agencies and the people they serve. We will demonstrate how open data and knowledge management depend on each other and strengthen one another, and examine the potential for open data guided by sound knowledge management practices can to improve public health governance, programs and practice, and research. The next installment will focus on open data sustainability – what defines it, why it is important, and why sound knowledge management is an integral part of it.

To see how Cadence Group uses this in action, see the Health IT Practices Page at http://www.cadence-group.com/practices/health-it/.

This piece is the first installment of a multi-part series called “Getting your Analytics Program off the Ground”

Analtytics

It seems like everyone is touting analytics these days, whether it is stories about its ability to predict market trends, coalesce seemingly disparate information into knowledge, or streamline business processes. On the other hand, horror stories – such as a store uncovering personal information about a teen before her parents, based on its analytics on her recent purchase history – also permeate social media.

So what is the definition of analytics? According to Wikipedia, the short answer is that analytics is the practices and processes employed to “facilitate discovery, interpretation, and communication of meaningful patterns in data.” These patterns are then analyzed to provide insight into business data, decisions, or processes. The long answer is a good deal more complicated, but one we have endeavored to outline here. Analytics is an umbrella practice, in that it has applications in many fields and can be employed for many purposes. The information patterns arising from the use of analytics can increase revenue, enable decision making, improve customer or public engagement, enhance operational efficiency, disclose compliance issues, reduce risk, and even predict problems before they occur. However, it is not a panacea, nor is there a ‘one-size fits all’ approach that will be effective. The unifying feature of analytics is that it is difficult to initiate and implement, and nigh impossible without the assistance of experts, who often only understand one field of analytics.

There are many hurdles that complicate the process of discovery, interpretation, and communication of the data. The most immediate issue is the quantity of data that needs to be analyzed. In the world of big data, the data sets are so large and complex that traditional tools are inadequate for sorting through them. To make matters worse, much of this data is unstructured. Defined by being text heavy or otherwise defying apparent classification, it is understandable how unstructured data can further complicate the difficult process of applying analytics to big data.

Another hurdle to producing relevant analytics work is simply time. Statistics like buying behavior change substantially over time, and other information can similarly become irrelevant. Thus, data has to be processed quickly and efficiently, or it can deteriorate in value. Information must remain relevant for the analytics process to be accurate, but is often stored for longer than this period. As obsolete information piles up, legal risks develop for those without clear retention schedules. The process of gathering information can cause privacy and ethics issues, since it can involve monitoring data usage patterns from individuals to predict future behavior.

One of the most obvious hurdles can be the most difficult to grasp and encompasses much of what we’ve discussed so far. Simply put: what is relevant? Incorrect data sets can obviously lead to bad outcomes and inaccurate conclusions. Less obvious is how to exclude incorrect or irrelevant data sets. As an example, consider the 2016 election, when President Donald Trump subverted expectations and emerged victorious, baffling political scientists across the country. Relevant data was overlooked, incorrect conclusions were drawn, and election analysts are left to question their suddenly irrelevant data collection strategies.

The overwhelming stockpiles that comprise big data can dissuade the organizations that need analytics the most. Employing analytics in areas rich with recorded information can offer efficiency and information to improve processes throughout an organization. The use of analytics can improve public health outcomes, prioritize information governance initiatives, lower acquisition costs, and reduce the cost of a data breach. But where do you start? Follow Cadence Group as we explore realistic and actionable approaches to get analytics programs off the ground. View our success stories with work in data analytics to create highly successful analytics program. Follow us as we post more about data analytics in the coming future for actionable strategies and information.  For more information on how we apply that knowledge and know-how through a customized level of service see our Practices Page.

 
NCHCMM, Cadence Group Exhibiting Booth 121, Aug. 15-17, 2017 AtlantaThe National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) is running the eleventh annual National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing, and Media (NCHCMM) from August 15th to 17th in Atlanta, Georgia. Cadence Group is hosting Booth 121 to share our public health contracting experience and discuss the themes of the conference. Our team will also have delicious, chocolate prizes for anyone who stops by to introduce themselves and share contact information. The booth will be open from 1-7pm on the 15th, 8am-5:30pm on the 16th, and 8am-1:30pm on the 17th.

With over 25 years experience providing health communication and information management services to public health agencies and organizations, Cadence Group’s services are an invaluable asset to those in the field. Dennis McDowell and Jessica Keralis, MPH, from Cadence Group’s public health leadership team have provided health communications expertise to many organizations such as CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics the Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, and NIOSH; ATSDR; Texas Department of State Health Services; Morehouse School of Medicine, the Global AIDS Program, and more. Tina Teree Baker, IGP, Ken Lewis, and Chad Damerell will also be at the event. Registration for the event is available online at https://www.nphic.org/nchcmm17-reg.

With sessions and workshops happening every day and an estimated 900 representatives from organizations and universities there is plenty to do at the conference. Come find us at Booth 121 Tuesday, August 15th through Thursday, August 17th with your questions and for information on how we can help you.

For more information on how we apply that knowledge and know-how through a customized level of service, see our Web & Content Management and Systems Design & Development Practice Pages.

PR Web
(http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/07/prweb14535304.htm)

About Cadence Group
Cadence Group, a certified woman owned small business, is a user-centric information management company with nearly 25 years of experience in consulting and information management services. Headquartered in Atlanta, GA, with an office in Washington, D.C., Cadence Group provides services to large federal agencies, as well as state and local governments. By combining information governance, process improvement, web content management, records & information management, library science, knowledge management, user experience, training and technology services, Cadence Group helps corporate and government clients easily obtain, manage, disseminate, and communicate information. Our clients optimize information assets, maintain compliance, and acquire information experts through our consulting and placement services. http://www.cadence-group.com

Cadence Group
1095 Zonolite Rd NE #105
Atlanta, G.A. 30306
Phone: (404) 874-0544
http://www.cadence-group.com

Jessica Keralis, MPH, Associate Director of Public Health Services, Cadence GroupCadence Group has hired Jessica Keralis, MPH as Associate Director of Public Health Services to strengthen our ability to provide high-quality data analytics and technology solutions for our clients’ needs in a rapidly evolving public health landscape. She has ten years of experience working with public health programs on the local, state, national, and international levels, providing guidance, technical assistance, research, program evaluation, and data analysis services to government agencies and organizations in the private and non-profit sectors. Her experience in health communications, research, epidemiology, and public health and healthcare analytics all make her a valuable addition to the Cadence Group team, and thus an asset for all of Cadence Group’s clients.

Ms. Keralis has an impressive array of data management and analysis skills, including building and maintaining databases, designing data collection protocols for studies and projects, training public health workers in data quality assurance, matching and analyzing large datasets, and building interactive data visualizations. She has six years of experience managing and analyzing public health epidemiologic and surveillance data, as well as performing analyses on healthcare enrollment, costs, utilization, and prescriptions.

Ms. Keralis’ experience is expansive. Her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals, books, and magazines and presented at national and international conferences, on topics including environmental health, HIV and STD prevention, human rights, climate change adaptation, and the global health employment market. Her experience with public health programs includes seven years managing communications and social media for American Public Health Association’s International Health Section, and coordinating a statewide ALS Surveillance Project for the state of Texas.

Ms. Keralis’ unique combination of technical skills, analytics expertise, and years of public health program experience in all sectors and agencies at various levels of government will further strengthen Cadence Group’s public health leadership team for current and future clients.

PR Web
(http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/07/prweb14506400.htm)

About Cadence Group
Cadence Group, a certified woman owned small business, is a user-centric information management company with nearly 25 years of experience in consulting and information management services. Headquartered in Atlanta, GA, with an office in Washington, D.C., Cadence Group provides services to large federal agencies, as well as state and local governments. By combining information governance, process improvement, web content management, records & information management, library science, knowledge management, user experience, training and technology services, Cadence Group helps corporate and government clients easily obtain, manage, disseminate, and communicate information. Our clients optimize information assets, maintain compliance, and acquire information experts through our consulting and placement services. http://www.cadence-group.com

Cadence Group
1095 Zonolite Rd NE #105
Atlanta, G.A. 30306
Phone: (404) 874-0544
http://www.cadence-group.com


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